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20121006
20121006
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in constitutional law. well, i'm here to say something about the argument of this book, which as you can have heard is called "i am the change." and the title is meant to bring out president obama's louis the xiv side. louis the xiv said -- i am the state. and mr. obama became very close in an press conference to saying i am the change. the title is actually from suggestion of my editor. and publishers, i had entertained another possibility, which was actually suggested to me my my friend bill. barack obama, what the hell were we thinking? [laughter] as opposed to some of my conservative colleagues and friends, i don't think we get very far by labeling president obama a socialist or by trying to trace his foreign origins or his secret muslim "devotions" nor i do think even that we greatly alumni nate things by to -- as my old friend argues in his movie and two books about obama. i think it's fairer to begin fairer and more useful in the end -- excuse me. to begin admitting president obama is what he call himself namely a progressive or a liberal. and the rest of the title is on barack obama and the
" is much law-abiding and much more manipulative and vicious than the joseph holt i know and underhanded. i think one of the things that the film tries to suggest is the federal government largely in the person of edwin stanton and the person of joseph holt basically railroaded poor mary to her death, and without any interest in what the truth was. they determined that she how would hang regardless and they went after her poor mary. and this just isn't the way the assassination trial played out. there was no deal between stanton and holt to make sure that she was convicted an son. it makes him out to a truly vengeful, two-dimensional character and doesn't reflect who he is as i know him. >> during the administration must have been a difficult job. could you sort of expand upon what that job was maybe before the war and the job that he ended up in? >> well, the job the before the war was basically there was one person who had a small office who kept track of whatever sorts of military sense occurred in an army that was 16,000 people strong. right up prior to the war. that's how big the u.s.
. there were people in legal law firm conference rom, they could get an internet connection. people in starbucks where they could get an internet connection. people working at the kitchen tables around town. and all of a sudden, right around april 1st. bestart moving to the headquarter. this is literally six week aways from the announcement. and this just this big space. bigger than the room. far bigger than the room. three or four times of the size of the room. it was a whole floor of the high-rise building in chicago, and it was just kind of remarkable. we didn't have everybody in. we were slowly bringing people in. literally we were still getting the servers up. we had telephones ringing and people try to answer phone calls. we had e-mail coming in to our e-mail address. we didn't have a system to receive e nail a real way that you would want. we had many coming many. we didn't have budgets. and we had, you know, we had constituency leaders calling our political department because they wanted to have time with the candidate, we had our fundraisers, who had to raise money with the
. it was the law passed unanimously by congress signed by president clinton in 1993 to restore the scope of religious freedom protection that existed under the free exercise clause which we were railing against. withstand back in place, struck down by the states in 1997 but the federal government, mandated by federal law, we already had two early decisions from district courts involving private plaintiffs or for profit plaintiffs and the issue to address the merits, there were procedural issues because of ongoing regulatory process that might create a sort of interim step in terms of going up and down the court but that actually is going to get resolved between now and august 1st, 2013. the administrative process will be done and the courts will invariably go straight and you will get merit decisions uniformly by the end of next year. >> those that depend on what the administration does and who wins? >> not really. what the administration has put into play is a piece of the problem. and also the constraints they put upon themselves in addressing that limited issue indicates that there is
, and that it should be abolished, regardless of what the laws of the state or the country said at the time. she came to brunswick because her husband got a job at bowdoin college. he stayed in ohio and and later moved to andover, in order to complete his contract there is a professor. she came without him with their children, and she was also six months pregnant. and she moved to brunswick in order to take up residency here, awaiting the arrival of her husband. the stories that were told of harriet beecher stowe is that she was a small and petite woman. she did not take much care in terms of how she dressed. but she was also very numerous for a woman of her time. she was known then mostly as a housewife. she wrote that she was totally overwhelmed with the number of children -- she had seven and she was pregnant -- that is what you would see as an overworked housewife and mother who came to worship here, probably with her children and her sisters, catherine beecher, and they all became members of this church. we first meet uncle tom in his hut. he is in a slave huts. he is learning to read the bible.
to agree with you with their level of investments. >> second row on the side. >> after rule of law committee for the oceans, in the mid century, nicholas said geography was one of the most important factors in foreign affairs because it was the most permanent. this year we just saw the arctic icecap dropped another 750,000 square kilometers and appears to be opening more this session. what do you think this trend will mean not next year or even next decade but in a generation as that becomes more open for russia and canada in particular. >> nicholas pikeman is someone i devote a whole chapter to in this book because he is very provocative and here is the man who when it was unclear that china where defeat japan, predicted that china who is our ally at the time would become our adversary for geographical reasons and also said when europe was fighting for its life against germany, united europe could be a competitor for the united states. she was very clear volume. in terms of the arctic icecap, this is playing out over decades. if you had an arctic open for shipping and a close frie
can practice our laws as we see fit. >> more about harriet beecher stowe's this weekend as booktv, american history tv and c-span local content vehicles with behind-the-scenes at the history of literary life of augusta, maine and noon eastern on booktv on c-span2 and sunday at 5:00 p.m. on american history tv on c-span3. >> michael grunwald presents his thoughts on the $800 billion stimulus bill, the american recovery reinvestment act signed into law by president obama on february 17, 2009. this is about 50 minutes. [applause] >> thanks, all of you, for coming and braving the rain. i am thrilled to start by 4 in new york. my wonderful parents are here. the only new yorkers who go to florida to visit their grandchildren. there are a lot of facts and figures and fun characters and colorful stories. i knew it was going to be controversial and it would be revisionist history of the obama stimulus and everybody hates the obama stimulus. obama he did too. a year after it passed a percentage of americans who believe the stimulus created jobs was lower than the percentage of americans w
the law. and i said they were bad laws. their customs, they were tradition, and we wanted america to be better to live up to the declaration of independence, make real our democracy. when i got arrested the first time this books and i felt free. i felt liberated and today more than ever i feel free in the liberated. abraham lincoln 150 years ago freed the slaves but it took the modern-day civil rights movement to elaborate a nation. [applause] i know some of you are asking where did you get the name "across that bridge," where do to get the title from, life lessons and the vision for change? just like a few short years ago since this is an election year, hundreds and thousands and millions of people come in 11 states and the old confederacy from virginia to texas couldn't register to vote simply cause of the color of their skin. people stood in line. it took a state like the state of mississippi in 1963, 1964, 1965 more than four need to keep those in the but only about 16 those and were registered to vote. there was a county in my native state of alabama and the heart of the blac
in the other financial institutions and the answer is that there is no law that they could hang them on. they could find nothing illegal and it wasn't for the want of trying and that's why we've still not seen the high level executives go to jail and why they are trying to push forward all of this nonsense financial reform the haven't been able to do. >> i don't know if it was for want of trying. >> you have the attorney general and the banks to own the place as upset about the senate. there wasn't an urge to prosecute. there were three questions i just want to be fair to affairs if you could change any part of the book, what would it be? >> that's a good question. i wonder if they mean if i would have written something or if the book history could have been different. >> if i would have written something differently that is an interesting question. i would like to have actually talked to kerry killinger, so that would have changed. i could have spent the entire book talking about the last month because there were so many politics and the decision appeared. >> has anyone been fascinated
of what was his first election. we continue to get materials from his office in the law firm in new york city, and it's still getting awards and generating material for his career and so they come to rest over time. in 1990 having just been elected the senate majority leader, mitchell was involved in the 1990 amendments to the act and this is a letter from george h. w. bush thanking him for his collaboration and succeeding in getting that legislation passed. the 1990 amendment was important for us today. we paid $4 a gallon for gas in the sense that it was the amendment that discussed the composition of gas and the introduction of chemicals during certain seasons of the year in order to make for cleaner air. in a sample of his writing style. there are researchers to come because they're interested in particular topics but there's also people that come because the interested in particular techniques or approaches. some people are interested in the newspapers because of the negotiation for instance. and so this is a research question that bridges a variety of the records that we have and o
to the top of the harvard law review and a blind test becomes a top editor there. everything he has done as clean as a whistle. he's never broken a law comment on it or want from a perfect father american and all they do is crash the guy. >> so that is the bar now been set for the presidency. he hasn't broken any law. okay, i think we all can accept the nomination for presidency. look, the only trashing that has been done over the last three and a half years is to our economy and to our international stature and that has been done by this president. and actually, chris, i personally have complimented president obama many times and i'll be listened to my radio show now i share to do a fair amount. look, president obama might not know a lot about economics, but he does a mean karaoke. siliceous celebrate that. let's all hold hearings. mus back so in love with you. ♪ ishat all? come on. imagine mitt romney doing that. ♪ i'm so in love with you. >> i'm sorry, you've got to give it to both sides. our second obamagasm award. there's a priester, i can go to confession. goes to someone who c
no child left behind has come into law is the kind of national psychosis, but there's something psychotic about it. it can't be numbered. it doesn't count. my father's psychiatrist use to take me to the back boards of mental hospitals in massachusetts and so many people on the most severe depression the only way they could ease their discomfort is by numbering everything. they would restlessly move object surrounded the table to get them in the pattern, and as i mentioned, some of the bureaucrats in washington maybe they would enjoy este in the recovery house to get over this numerical what action. this hoping of judging children and their teachers primarily on the basis of that very narrow slice of purely mechanistic skills that can be measured more simplistically by standardized exam and ruling out as a consequence ruling out all of those more authentic forms of culture that are not reduced to numbers like reading books for pleasure. it's the only reason i read a book. you get no points for pleasure or asking thoughtful questions or indulging curiosity, developing real critical capacity
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12